The Studio Series 2.0: Caroline Z. Hurley, Textile Designer

Slip into a jumpsuit and you feel invincible — at least, that’s how textile designer Caroline Z. Hurley feels when she wears Ilana Kohn’s coveralls. “I can go on any adventure in them,” she says, “I can do cartwheels and flips, plus, it is literally the coziest thing I’ve ever worn.”  As a maker of textiles for the home — including rugs, blankets, throws, pillows and quilts — comfort is extremely important to her. Seriously, being cozy is practically her life motto.

Here, she takes Ilana Kohn’s all-purpose coveralls for a spin and answers our rapid-fire Q&A.

The Studio Series 2.0: Tea Leigh, Tattoo Artist

The simple silhouette and sturdy Japanese canvas fabric of Ilana Kohn’s coveralls allow for them to be totally durable and easily to move around in, which was what drew handpoke tattoo artist Tea Leigh to them. “The coverall is great for me because it’s incredibly functional, simple, and made for almost any setting,” she tells us. “I can easily move in them when I’m tattooing, and I don’t have to worry about getting dirty because I know it’s such a durable fabric.” In her spare time, Tea also photographs and makes music to mainstream creativity outside of work. “I love that I can work in them all day either shooting, tattooing, or at practice and then I can go out and just with a change of shoes the outfit becomes a little dressed up.” Amen. Meet the creative below and check out how amazing she looks in the Ilana Kohn one and done.

The Studio Series 2.0: Shino Takeda, Ceramicist

“I love coveralls, simply because they’re easy and fit my lifestyle, but I especially love Ilana’s,” ceramicist Shino Takeda says. The full-time ceramicist grew up in Kyushu Island in southern Japan and then moved to New York City when she was twenty years old. Working in Greenpoint, Brooklyn, Shino’s inspirations comes from the nature she sees, feels, tastes and hears each season. Her work is hand-built using the coil method and several different clay bodies, so the coveralls are basically perfect for her. “I feel like the coverall is even better when it gets dirty with paint and clay! Plus, it has BIG pockets. I can put my iPhone in them and listen to music when I work in my studio or when I go for walks.” Shino shows off her pair and answers all our questions below.

The Studio Series 2.0: Doug Johnston and Tomoe Matsuoka, Artists

“We don’t want to have to worry about what we’re wearing in the studio,” explain artist Doug Johnston. “Eventually all of our clothes become ‘studio’ clothes because we wear them to the studio and they get oil stains or resin or wax or liquid foam on them, or they get ripped.” Doug’s work oscillates between art and design, primarily utilizing a process of coiling and machine-stitching cordage creating an array of functional sculptural objects. He often collaborates with his wife, artist and designer Tomoe Matsuoka, whose work varies from furniture to wearables, space design, performance and photography. Yes, they’re the definition of power couple and, yes, they both rep the Ilana Kohn coveralls well. “We can change into these coveralls when we get to the studio and not worry about ruining our entire wardrobe,” explains Doug Johnston. Plus, they’re super comfortable, simple and stylish, while being truly durable and useful with several big, easily-accessible pockets where we can keep our phones, keys, notes, and snacks!”

Get to know Doug and Tomoe below as they put the coveralls to work.

The Studio Series: Caroline Ventura of BRVTVS and Calliope

“No two days of work are alike for me,” Caroline Ventura says. “I often find myself splitting time between working in the studio or overseeing production in the diamond district to being in Calliope with customers.” The New York-based jewelry designer and co-owner of Meatpacking District design boutique Calliope is a longtime friend of Ilana Kohn and you might recognize the petite bombshell babe from the lookbook photos from past seasons. For BRVTVS, Caroline mixes masculine and feminine inspiration for delicate jewelry handmade in her studio using reclaimed materials whenever possible. Naturally, she turned to Ilana for help in the versatile wardrobe department. “It’s sometimes tough to have so many costume changes throughout the day, so wearing a piece that can transition from being alone working and getting messy to meeting people face to face is a hell of a lot easier. Plus, this type of coverall always looks better once it has a little schmutz on it, so it’s okay if I get a little dirty while working.”