3 Ways To Wear Our Exclusive French Terry Gary Jumpsuit

You know the saying: beauty is pain. Well, we’ll let you in on a little secret: that’s a lie. There’s nothing better than looking good and feeling good, and with a jumpsuit, you get the best of both those worlds — they are ridiculously easy to pull on and you literally don’t have to do anything else to style them up, unless you really want to (a cute shoe, some jewelry and a hat go a long way). Not to mention, you pretty much feel like you rolled out of bed and you’re wearing your pajamas in public, but in the most amazing way possible. Right now, we’re living in our Ilana Kohn Gary Jumpsuit. Sleeveless with a scoop neck, drop crotch and cropped leg, it’s the Brooklyn designer’s signature silhouette, only this time she’s done it for us in a super soft French Terry fabric that’s so lightweight it keeps us cool through sticky summer days, content on balmy nights and looking on point at all times. Imagine wearing your favorite gray sweatshirt, but all over your body. Sounds amazing, right? It is. Think weekend dressing that can seamlessly translate to the everyday and the evening. And with tracksuits trending this season, it’s also right on the mark.

For a little extra inspiration, our friends at One of a Few boutique in Vancouver styled the exclusive Ilana Kohn French Terry Gary Jumpsuit three ways. This is how we wear it.

Ilana Kohn jumpsuit layered look

Worn with Assembly short sleeve tee, Martiniano Glove in White and Clyde Room Backpack in Golden Brown.

Ilana Jumpsuit weekend look

Worn with Rachel Comey Zia Trench, The Palatines Caelum Slide in Black, Building Block Cylinder Bag in Black and Clyde wide brim gaucho hat.

ilana-kohn-terry-gary-look-2

Worn with Martiniano Glove in Black, Andrea Wong Rendezvous Clutch (similar here), Muraco Wolfe Macaroni Bracelet, Catherine Hartley silver rings (similar here) and neck cuff.

Meet the Artist: Camilla Engstrom

Take a quick browse through the online portfolio on Camilla Engstrom’s website and you’ll find paintings of dicks, sketches of poo being penetrated, and a voluptuous pink character named Husa that gets herself into all kinds of predicaments. They’re provocative images that will definitely make you smile, but the Sweden-born, Brooklyn-based artist uses her sense of humor to tackle more pressing issues of sexuality and gender. Camilla, who first moved to New York to study fashion at FIT, applies her playful-yet-profound approach off canvas, too, and onto her quirky textiles and her personal style, through which she combines minimalist and bohemian aesthetics. Now, along with working towards a solo exhibition at Long Island’s Deli Gallery, Camilla’s stepping in front of the camera modeling our exclusive collaboration with designer and fellow New Yorker, Ilana Kohn. The Gary Jumpsuit, made in a special French Terry fabric, is effortless and easygoing — just like the girl who wears it.

“Ilana and I found each other through mutual friends who have a brand called Cold Picnic,” she explains. “I love the jumpsuit because it’s so comfortable. It feels like I’m not wearing anything. It’s durable yet light. Perfect for hot summers in NY.”

Here, we go behind the scenes with Camilla to learn more about Husa and her world.

Camilla Engstrom

The Studio Series: Caroline Ventura of BRVTVS and Calliope

“No two days of work are alike for me,” Caroline Ventura says. “I often find myself splitting time between working in the studio or overseeing production in the diamond district to being in Calliope with customers.” The New York-based jewelry designer and co-owner of Meatpacking District design boutique Calliope is a longtime friend of Ilana Kohn and you might recognize the petite bombshell babe from the lookbook photos from past seasons. For BRVTVS, Caroline mixes masculine and feminine inspiration for delicate jewelry handmade in her studio using reclaimed materials whenever possible. Naturally, she turned to Ilana for help in the versatile wardrobe department. “It’s sometimes tough to have so many costume changes throughout the day, so wearing a piece that can transition from being alone working and getting messy to meeting people face to face is a hell of a lot easier. Plus, this type of coverall always looks better once it has a little schmutz on it, so it’s okay if I get a little dirty while working.”

 

The Studio Series: Julianne Ahn of Object & Totem

The return of the jumpsuit might be one of fashion’s biggest comebacks of late, but for anyone getting their hands dirty in a studio, the return of the coverall beats a Studio 54-era onsie any day of the week. “I was bugging Ilana [Kohn] about making one for me last year after I was on a relentless search for one to wear to studio,” recalls Julianne Ahn, the beauty behind the ceramics from Object & Totem. Known for her mixed media necklaces and glazed vessels, the Brooklyn-based ceramic artist is getting her wish granted this week as we launch Ilana Kohn’s exclusive, limited-edition Lola Utility Coverall this Thursday. “Having one designed by a friend is going to be really special so I’m looking forward to the history of what it might look like well worn years from now.”

“Our many maker friends really responded to this particular style, saying it would be the perfect workwear,” Ilana says of her best-selling Lola Coverall. “So this one is made to get mucky, roughed up and lived in!” The Lola Utility Coverall, available Thursday, October 1, features a heavy, work-friendly cotton twill and is made in New York City’s garment district.

This week we’ll be featuring four New York-based makers whose personal and studio style inspired it all. First up, we get to know Julianne.

Sixties prints and soft hues rule for Ilana Kohn’s FW15 collection

As we countdown to Fall, we asked a few of our favorite designer friends to share their mood boards for the season. This week, we get a peek inside the creative mind of Ilana Kohn:

“Overall, I was really feeling the winter whites and pastels. Ha, it def made the collection feel a bit summery, but whatevs. I like summer! Layering was also something I was trying to think about. Most of the pieces in this collection are meant to be worn layered. Print wise, I was def looking at a lot of bold ’60s prints – clean and graphic.”