The Insider’s Guide to Richmond, Virginia

Richmond, Virginia is a small but mighty city. As the capital of the Commonwealth of Virginia since 1780—as well as the capital of the Confederacy during the Civil War—it’s a town steeped in history, evident in its well-preserved, historic architecture. Now, with a thriving influx of creatives, Richmond has turned into a young community of small businesses, nonprofits and endless opportunities. “Everyone is so creative and supportive of each other,” says Emi Moore, owner of Casa Shop. With more than 20 craft breweries, a ton of amazing restaurants, and beautiful street art on every other corner, there is always something to do and see. Plus, everything is an easy walk or short drive away.

We wanted to get the low-down on the best places to eat, drink and people watch, so we reached out to the people we love most: the city’s boutique owners and designers. Trust us, after this guide, you’ll be bumping Richmond to the top of your must-visit list.

 

WHERE TO EAT

“My favorite place to eat is Edo’s Squid,” says Kate Jennings of Na Nin. “Butter parmesan spaghetti, eggplant parm, great house wine, and it is accommodating to all diets with wonderful vegetarian and vegan options.”

Emi Moore, owner of Casa Shop continues the Edo’s Squid rave. “They have the best pasta and a cozy candlelit atmosphere. Caroline Young, artist and jewelry designer of Giantlion, admits her soft spot for the restaurant too. “It has been my favorite restaurant for the past 12 years!”

Edo’s Squid, 411 N Harrison St

Photo via @stellas

Kristy Cotter, designer of Drift Riot and owner of Dear Neighbor, doesn’t mess around when it comes to places to grab a bite. Here’s her expert list: “Brenner Pass, Metzger, Dutch & Co., Saison, Sub Rosa Bakery and Can Can.”

Brenner Pass, 3200 Rockbridge St Suite #100

Metzger Bar and Butchery, 801 N 23rd St

Dutch & Company, 400 N 27th St

Saison, 23 W Marshall St

Sub Rosa Bakery, 620 N 25th St

Can Can, 3120 W Cary St

“Mamma Zu (an old-school Italian restaurant), never disappoints,” declares Deborah Boschen, the founder and owner of boutique Verdalina, which has been one of the city’s source for slow-philosophy wardrobe essentials since it opened its doors in 2013.

Mamma Zu, 501 S Pine St

WHERE TO DRINK

Photo via @brennerpassrva

Christine Young, the designer behind jewelry line Young Frankk (you know those cult-favorite hand earrings), heads to Brenner Pass when in need of a drink. Their eclectic cocktail menu is sure to satisfy all your fancy drink needs. Think: Tito’s handmade vodka, green chartreuse, cocchi americano, lemon, and pineapple-lavender syrup. Caroline also recommends cocktails from Brenner Pass followed by Mekong for beer.

Brenner Pass, 3200 Rockbridge St Suite #100

Mekong, 6004 W Broad St

“Bamboo Cafe is an institution in Richmond with a diverse crowd and a beautiful, old marble bar,” says Deborah.

“I can have a drink anywhere!” Kate admits. But she has three solid suggestions: “Stella’s, which is not only great for cocktails but the food is some of the most delicious Greek dishes ever and they always have impressive specials, Helen’s for a fun night out, and Enoteca Sogno. It’s right in my neighborhood, so I love to enjoy a glass of wine there and the ambiance is lovely.”

Bamboo Cafe, 1 S Mulberry St

Stella’s, 1012 Lafayette St

Helen’s Restaurant, 2527 W Main St

Enoteca Sogno, 223 Bellevue Ave

@stellas

Emi reveals a fresh spot to check out. “A place just opened called The Circuit, it’s a bar/arcade combo, which is a new concept for Richmond. I’ve only been once but I feel like it will be my new spot. Plus, they have self serve wine on tap!”

The Circuit, 3121 W Leigh T

WHERE TO PEOPLE WATCH

“Quirk Hotel, Virginia Museum of Fine Arts for happy hour––very interesting mix of people in the summer, or Can Can at the bar,” Kristy says. Emi also heads to the VMFA. “During the warmer months, they have a beautiful lawn with a great happy hour, it is where you’ll find me (and everyone else in Richmond) on most Fridays.”

Quirk Hotel, 201 W Broad St

VMFA, 200 N Boulevard

Can Can, 3120 W Cary St

Photo via @quirkhotel

Caroline loves to people watch when she goes to concerts. (Who doesn’t?). “Vagabond for live music just about any night of the week,” she says.

It’s all about Carytown––Richmond’s quirky ever-changing neighborhood filled with a ton of shops and restaurants––for Christine.

“If you like to be around a lot of people and want an opportunity to make new friends, I think Lamplighter has a great set up, and always a full patio of people enjoying coffee and fare,” explains Kate. “It’s also right across the street from our shop and our lovely neighbours, Addison Handmade & Vintage and Yesterday’s Heroes.

Vagabond, 700 E Broad St

Lamplighter, 3 Locations

Lead image (left to right): @brennerpassrva, @vmfamuseum, @lamplightercoffee, @naninstudio

The Insider’s Guide to Vancouver

It may come as a surprise that Vancouver, British Columbia has been ranked by travel experts as one of the most beautiful cities in the world, alongside knockouts like Sydney, Kyoto, and Rome. But with an unrivaled setting of endless mountains and copious amounts of swimmable waters — from the Pacific ocean to local lakes and rivers — it takes the cake as the most stunning, calming metropolitan area we know. Vancouver’s accessibility to nature lets you start your day in the mountains, head to the beach for the afternoon, and end in the heart of a bustling downtown. Not to mention, the air is seriously fresh anywhere you go — like, smell the glacier waters and pine trees fresh. Plus, it also happens to be the home to Garmentory’s Canadian HQ.

 As a tourist hotspot, you can no doubt find 100 city guides on Vancouver, but we’ve got one unlike any other thanks to our community of local creatives. (Shop the boutiques and designers right here on Garmentory!). Scroll on to discover the best places to eat, drink, and people watch straight from the city’s boutique owners, designers, and style influencers. 

WHERE TO EAT

“Ask For Luigi is one of my favourite restaurants in the city,” says Kleah Graham, co-owner of boutique Charlie & Lee. “Honest, simple, high-quality Italian food in a charming little building,” she explains.“My top list is about 30 restaurants long, though, and I can never decide on an absolute number one! [There’s] an abundance of excellent food in this city.”

Ask for Luigi by Christopher Flett

Saager Dilawri and Karyna Schultz, owners of Neighbour, a boutique in the historic neighborhood Gastown, also can’t just pick one favorite restaurant. “Too many to name,” says Saager, “but for starters: Ask for Luigi, Savio Volpe, Bao Bei, Carp, The Birds and The Beets and Pazzo Chow.”

Designer Sunja Link and Stephanie Gorrell, owner of Umeboshi also declared their love for Ask for Luigi.

Ask For Luigi, 305 Alexander Street

Savio Volpe, 615 Kingsway

Bao Bei, 163 Keefer Street

Carp, 2516 Prince Edward Street

The Birds and The Beets, 55 Powell Street

Pazzo Chow, 620 Quebec Street

Ask for Luigi by Christopher Flett

For brunch, designer Erin Templeton likes Alibi Room, a beautiful restaurant in a historic building with over 50 taps of local and imported craft beer, plus delicious, local food. Michaela Smeaton, the designer behind Folk Fortune suggests Teahouse in Stanley Park for brunch.“I’m a vegetarian,” she says, “so I prefer places where I have more than a veggie burger to choose from. Heirloom, East is East, Flying Pig, Meet, and Pizzeria Farina all have good options.” Marie Foxall,  the designer behind jewelry line Wasted Effort, offers even more veg-friendly options. “It is a really easy place to be vegan,” she says of Vancouver, “especially with restaurants like The Arbor. It’s like the low-key little sister of The Acorn (which is also amazing), and their deep-fried oyster mushrooms are the stuff of dreams.”

Alibi Room, 157 Alexander Street

Teahouse, 7501 Stanley Park Drive

Heirloom Vegetarian, 1509 W 12th Avenue

East is East, 4433 Main Street

The Flying Pig, 127 W 2nd Avenue

MeeT on Main, 4288 Main Street

Pizzeria Farina, 915 Main Street

The Arbor, 3941 Main Street

The Acorn, 3995 Main Street

Savio Volpe by Knauf and Brown

 

WHERE TO DRINK

“I love the bar at L’Abattoir,” says Sarah Savoy, who owns the Main Street boutique Much & Little. “Bao Bei never disappoints for a delicious, inventive cocktail,” she adds. Amy Renee York and Noah MacNayr-Heath, the super cute couple behind boutique Nouvelle Nouvelle are emphatic about Boxcar. Located between a pizza shop and popular concert venue, it’s kind of the best place to grab a drink, see a show, then get some midnight ‘za.

Style influencer Kirstyn König has a favorite spot nice and close to her home. “My favourite little neighbourhood gem is Grapes and Soda,” she says, “a natural wine bar that also has an incredible cocktail and dinner menu. It’s a small, intimate space with a speakeasy vibe and is tucked away next door to another must-try restaurant, The Farmer’s Apprentice.”

33 Acres via @33acresbrewing

“Best cocktail stumbling distance from my house is Nomad, with some of the best bartenders in Vancouver,” reveals Alex Chichak of Still Life boutique. “Otherwise, I’d spend every spare summer moment sipping a paloma at El Camino’s.”

Lauren Clark and Lyndsey Chow, the ladies behind vintage clothing and lifestyle boutique Hey Jude, have a very special place to drink. “We’re probably biased but on Fridays we’ll hang and have happy hour at our shop (all are welcome!).” They also suggest, “for a favourite local spot we head to 33 Acres for craft beer and cider. If you’re lucky you’ll hit a night with live music.”

L’Abattoir, 217 Carrall Street

Boxcar, 923 Main Street

Grapes and Soda, 1541 W 6th Avenue

The Farmer’s Apprentice, 1535 W 6th Avenue

Nomad, 3950 Main Street

El Caminos, 3250 Main Street

33 Acres, 15 W 8th Avenue

WHERE TO PEOPLE WATCH

Daniel Caesar at The Biltmore by Nicole Wong

“Coffee shops are ideal places to people watch. I’m lucky to have great ones really close to both my house and my shop: Prado on Commercial Drive and Kafka’s on Main Street,” Sarah says.  Amy and Noah like Revolver, a coffee shop in Gastown, for people watching. Grab a seat on one of the benches out front and scope out the local scene (then hit the new Nouvelle Nouvelle location, right around the corner).

Kirstyn heads to the outdoor patio at the Gallery Cafe. “It’s nestled away on the second level of the Vancouver Art Gallery, overlooking Robson Square,” she explains. “Grabbing a glass of wine and basking in the sun after perusing the gallery is one of my favourite weekend activities.” Vancouverite and travel blogger Nicole Wong loves to people watch when she goes to concerts (try the Biltmore to catch emerging acts). “It’s really interesting to check out the crowd and just observe the people who like the same music as I do,” she says.

Marie, of Wasted Effort, has great people watching in her workspace. “From the window of my studio on Columbia Street in Chinatown [I can see] a strange microcosm of humanity, incorporating every element of stereotypical Vancouver life… and it’s endlessly entertaining.”

Prado, 1938 Commercial Drive

Kafka’s Coffee and Tea, 2525 Main Street

Gallery Café, 750 Hornby Street

Biltmore Cabaret, 2755 Prince Edward Street

Revolver, 325 Cambie Street

If you can’t get yourself to Vancouver any time soon, don’t freight. We’ve got all the best boutiques and designers right here on Garmentory. Shop the city’s finest from the comfort of your couch.

Anna Gray’s Go-To Spots During New York Fashion Week

Did you know that I moved to New York as a totally clueless 18-year-old with a college acceptance letter, side bangs and stretchy purple Urban Outfitters jeans? Entire inner worlds are destroyed and rebuilt between the ages of 18 and 28 anyway, but imagine living that out in New York City. But I didn’t die and here I am, bedecked in cool-girl garments, mostly emotionally sound and holding an iced almond latte ready to show you around. (The purple pants are long gone, I promise). The first thing you learn in this here town is that lifespans are short. Favorite bars, vintage stores, restaurants, fast first year friends? All gone. The key is to visit favorites often, experiment with new places and avoid serious attachment. A bit like dating, for some.

Anyway, here are my favorite places that are still around. Though they did just open a Starbucks on the corner of St. Marks Place and Avenue A, so  this is probably the end of NYC as we (I) know it. Swing by any of my below go-to spots  during Fashion Week and you might catch me hiding out.

Aurora Vestita skirt; Catzorange bag; Vans sneakers

6th & B Garden: Okay, this place will be here for awhile because it’s a city sanctioned non-profit. Also, it looks like all of your secret garden dreams come true. There’s a treehouse! Drink your morning coffee in here and make a calm memory you can return to when you’re sprinting between shows.

Still House: I swing by Still House before any birthday/baby shower/wedding to pick up something small, beautiful and reasonably priced. Their ceramics and minimal jewelry are great. It’s a tiny shop so browsing is quick – i.e. it’s a great place to kill the tiny amount of time you have before your next appointment.

Town Clothes blouse c/o Either, And; Glass earrings c/o The Drive New York

Mogador: A classic since 1983. You’ve probably been here but I’m putting it on the list in case you haven’t. Delicious Moroccan food, reasonable prices and it’s on my block so you’ll likely run into me and we can talk about how great it is! Go on off hours like 3:30pm to avoid a long wait.

Oliver St Coffee: From the team that made Mr Fongs (more on that later), Oliver Coffee is a kind reprieve from the usual laptop-crowded cafe and also the mayhem that is fashion week. The magazine selection is great, they have obscure Asian snacks and the coffee/tea/milk options are plentiful.

Coming Soon: Fabiana and Helena are women with taste as excellent as their dispositions. They carry Chen & Kai, Concrete Cat, Fredericks and Mae, to name drop a few. They have lots of small cute gifts, so even if you’re in for the long haul of fashion month you can snag a souvenir. I go in for gifts but want everything for myself.

Town Clothes blouse c/o Either, And; Glass earrings c/o The Drive New York

Mr Fongs: Too many of my favorite bars have closed in New York but it’s okay because now we have Fongs. It’s cute, they have snacks and banquettes and the bartenders are nice. I highly suggest going when it’s still sunny out, it looks prettier.

Starstruck Vintage: Great vintage that requires a little digging but not too much. Sunglasses, dresses from all eras, and the bag selection is solid. Their vintage tees are outrageously expensive though! It’s on the west side, so you can stop by when you’re heading east after leaving the piers.

Kes NYC dress

Text by Anna Gray

Photography by Chloe Horseman

The Ins-And-Outs Of New York City With Our Boutiques And Designers

There is no arguing that New York City is a magical, fast-paced, concrete zoo filled with bustling creatives in every realm possible. It’s the city that never sleeps and, as any denizen or tourist can attest, has hundreds of unspoken rules that you best know before coming (like don’t make eye contact on the subway, never take a selfie at a museum, and always move out of the middle of the sidewalk if you are a slow walker). It is also home to many of our close friends, the emerging designers and indie boutique owners that live the city day in and day out; the people we turn to for the inside scoop on how to survive manic, hectic, addictive, draining New York City.

To kick off New York Fashion Week, possibly one of the craziest times to be in the city, we wanted to reveal the best of the Big Apple from our New Yorkers. Scroll on for tips on where to escape the madness, wisdom on how to de-stress, and where to get the best cup of joe.

 

WHERE IN NEW YORK CITY DO YOU FEEL MOST PRODUCTIVE?

Image by Michael Cobarrubia

New York can be an extremely productive city, and on the other hand extremely playful city,” says Ivan Gilkes, co-owner of In Support Of, a boutique and showroom in Manhattan’s Nolita neighborhood. “The trick comes to knowing when to turn it off, and when to turn it on,” he explains.

Szeki Chan of 7115 by Szeki says her studio is her most productive place. “Quiet, peaceful, and no distractions,” she explains. Assembly’s Greg Armas agrees, saying his Chinatown studio is where he gets in the zone. “It’s nice to be surrounded by the city but slightly isolated,” he says. For designer Nikki Chasin it’s her studio in Chelsea.

But for others, being on the on go is what sparks productivity. Anna Pang, the designer behind womenswear line Index Series, says her brain is best “on the train! I tend to have sudden revelations of what my inspiration, concept, ideas are for collections.” Katie Goldman Macdonald, designer of House Dress, bounces off the energy of the Garment District. “It’s where everything happens. I run back and forth between my factories, button, and fabric stores — as well as coffee shops — and end up feeling pretty satisfied (and exhausted) by the end of the day.”

 

HOW MANY COFFEES/TEAS/LIQUIDS DO YOU DRINK A DAY? WHERE’S YOUR GO-TO SPOT?

Image by Hannah Schneider

At least two,” admits Mandy Kordal, designer of knitwear label Kordal. “I need coffee to start my day, and then around 4pm I either make another batch of coffee or tea,” Luis Morales, co-founder and creative director of The Ensign, is also dedicated to that AM caffeine fix. “I try to limit myself to one coffee a day, but it’s a mandatory request for each morning.” He likes to stop at Café Integral (above) for his one a day. Greg heads to Doughnut Plant. “Creature of habit, I have one Americano every morning… and a doughnut.”

Stacia Canyon, owner and buyer of boutique Canon NYC, which is located on Sullivan Street in Soho has her liquid day mapped out to a T. “One to two coffees a day from Cafe Regular in Brooklyn or Colombe on Prince Street in SoHo, then one matcha latte from Banter on Sullivan Street in Manhattan, and finally one juice from the Juice Press in Manhattan.”

Image by Matt Johnson

Szeki opts for, “just one, two tops!” She goes to, “Caffe Vita if I’m close to our LES location, Ninth Street Espresso if I’m at the studio in the East Village, and Sweatshop (above) if I’m at the Williamsburg location.” While on the other hand Katie’s average is, “five coffees a day.I love Madman Espresso on 35th, Grumpys on 37th and Culture on 36th in the Garment District. Sometimes if I’m feeling too caffeinated, I’ll sneak in an herbal iced tea or kombucha.”

As for the non-coffee drinkers: “I drink fresh juice in the morning from Kabila across the street from my studio then I drink water throughout the rest of the day. I don’t really drink coffee unless I’m trying to stay up really late or pull an all nighter to work,” explains Dominic Sondag, the designer behind menswear line S.K. Manor Hill.

Adeniyi Okuboyejo, the designer of Post-Imperial, also prefers a fruity option. “I usually get smoothies from the bodega around the corner of my apartment.”

 

WHERE DO YOU GO TO GET FRESH AIR?

Image by Michael Cobarrubia

Escaping the concrete craziness is essential. “I love to go to Jefferson Park for fresh air. It’s a beautiful garden on the grounds of what used to be an infamous women’s prison, a hidden jewel. I’m also often at Washington Square dog park,” says Kelly Colasanti, owner of Fairlight, a beautiful boutique located in the West Village of Manhattan.

The ladies of Duo NYC, Wendy and LaRae Kangas, love to go for, “ a run along the East River. It’s breezy and great for people watching. But for a dose of real fresh air we take a road trip upstate to Woodstock or Hudson.”

“The parks in NYC are the best,” proclaims Ivan. “I have a top four depending on my mood: Grand Ferry Park is a super cute and tiny inlet park in Williamsburg with great views of Manhattan above the Williamsburg Bridge. Brooklyn Bridge Park Pier 1 has an equally fantastic view of downtown Manhattan and a great lawn for sipping wine with friends. Prospect Park, which in my opinion is better than Central Park, is the best park for activities all year round. It’s great for a picnic and party during the summer and in the winter if it snows you can sled on the Long Meadow there. Last the High Line is a super fun park for people watching and at the end of it you can finish your visit to the park with a trip to the Whitney.”

But sometimes no nature is needed at all. “When I’m at work I’ll step outside the studio to the street on 39th and if I’m at my house I’ll sit on the stoop,” expresses Dominic.

 

DURING FASHION WEEK, HOW DO YOU GET PUMPED UP? AND THEN, HOW DO YOU DE-STRESS?

Image by Michael Cobarrubia

“The buzz of the shows and the anticipation of the collections generally gets me excited,” explains Luis. Ivan has a similar reaction. “Fashion Week can be an extremely fast paced time during the year. Getting pumped up for it doesn’t take that much though. If there is a brand that I’m really pumped to see I feel the excitement come naturally.” His trick once he feels overwhelmed? “I like to return to my home and watch some TV and tune out of fashion completely. This coming fashion week fall shows will be back I’m sure I’ll be watching How to Get Away with Murder and hopefully Scandal.”

For designers, things can be a little different. “I get pumped up when I have all of my samples ready to shoot,” says Nikki. Katie explains how she’s, “just naturally high on adrenaline (and coffee) for a week straight during Fashion Week.” So undoubtingly needs, “to lie comatose for a few days and drink a lot of Sauvignon Blanc in the tub.”

Getting pumped for Anna starts with, “an early rest and a somewhat substantial breakfast (scrambled eggs, toast and an apple).” To de-stress, she likes to, “light a candle, lie in bed and put on a cool face mask for 30 minutes. I never feel like I have time to actually do this so when I do it feels extra amazing.”

Sometimes after that crazy week, it takes an actual escape. “For de-stress, I usually leave for a bit after Fashion Week, it can be intense,” admits Greg.

 

ON A SCALE OF 1 TO 10 HOW MUCH DO YOU LOVE NEW YORK CITY?

Image by Michael Cobarrubia

“My love for NYC is a rollercoaster. I’m from Northern California and that’s a hard place to beat, but I’ve lived here for 6 years and I love it a little more every year. Hot sweaty days where I’m carrying 50 lbs of fabric in the Garment District I rate a four, but when I get home and see the trees of Inwood park out my window, my love surges to a ten,” says Katie. Luis has the same teetering feelings. It’s about a two from January-March, a four in March-April, a solid ten from May-July, back down to one in August, and about an eight from September through December. We have a love/hate relationship, but we somehow make it work.”

For others, their love for the city is undeniable. “Ten. After living almost fifteen years in this city, I wouldn’t live anywhere else in the world. New York has the absolute best of it all,” asserts Ivan. Wendy and LaRae agree, “Eight to ten depending on the day but there’s no place quite like NYC, we’ve got it all here.”

“Ten for sure! I love NYC so much!” professes Kelly.

Both Nikki and Adeniyi went for eleven. “To be honest, I am not sure there is any better city in the world than New York. It keeps me on my toes. It constantly kicks me in the ass to remind me that even with all my accomplishments so far, there is still tons of work that needs to be done,” Adeniyi admits.

“It’s required to 100% love New York City to live here,” states Greg.

Lead and featured image by Michael Cobarrubia

The Insider’s Guide To Seattle

As the largest metropolis of the Pacific Northwest, there is no shortage of things to do, sites to see, and people to know in Seattle, WA. The city has something for everyone, from picturesque mountains to diverse neighborhoods, all sandwiched between the epic Pacific ocean and the second largest freshwater lake in Washington. Seattle is famously known for its iconic Space Needle, rainy reputation, and being home to the first Starbucks — but we wanted to dig a little deeper and uncover the city’s lesser-known gems. Plus, it also happens to be the home of Garmentory’s stateside HQ. This is where our network of local boutiques and designers comes in. Not to brag, but we happen to work with some of the city’s coolest creatives, so instead of relying on dusty tourist books or travel apps, we asked them to reveal the best places to eat, drink, and people watch. Start planning your west coast adventure now.

WHERE TO EAT

“Food is high on the list of reasons why I love this city,” boasts Alisa Furoyama, co-owner of design shop Glasswing. She suggests heading to “Single Shot, especially for weekend brunch, Harry’s Fine Foods for breakfast or lunch, Juicebox for a wellness shot, Plum for vegetarian, and Agua Verde for summer tacos.”

Single Shot, 611 Summit Ave E

Harry’s Fine Foods, 601 Bellevue Ave E

Juicebox, 1517 12th Ave #100

Plum Bistro, 1429 12th Ave

Agua Verde, 1303 NE Boat St

Julia Briggs, founder of New Jersey boutique Mothers + Daughters, recently made the move to Seattle and like Alisa, she loves Harry’s Fine Food for brunch!” She also notes “Suika (below) and Japanese food in general. The sushi here is amazing.”

Suika, 611 Pine St

Image c/o Suika

Suk Chai, designer of womenswear label SCHAI, has a few must-eat recommendations: “Sitka and Spruce, Oddfellows, Whale Wins, Walrus and Carpenter,” she suggests.”You can’t go wrong dining at restaurants who create food inspired by locally sourced and foraged ingredients,” she adds.

Sitka and Spruce, 1531 Melrose Ave

Oddfellows, 1525 10th Ave

The Whale Wins, 3506 Stone Way N

The Walrus and the Carpenter, 4743 Ballard Ave NW

Deborah Roberts, co-owner of Belltown boutique RIZOM and the designer behind ready-to-wear line Silvae, reveals that Cascina Spinasse is her go to for a special meal. “They focus on recipes and techniques from the Piedmont region of Northern Italy, while incorporating products of artisans and small farmers from the Pacific Northwest.” Her inside tip: “Sit at the bar where you have a great view of the open kitchen and can watch the pasta being made by hand.”

Cascina Spinasse, 1531 14th Ave

WHERE TO DRINK

Images c/o Sun Liquor

Forget Starbucks, Seattle has what feels like a limitless amount of places to grab a cup of Jo. The two best according to our Alisa and Suk: Analog and Caffe Vita.

Analog, 235 Summit Ave E

Caffe Vita, multiple locations

Now let’s talk happy hour. “If it’s a weeknight, Foreign National for interesting flavors,” says Alisa, “or Sun Liquor (above) for cocktails and something cozy.” Deborah is also an advocate for both Foreign National and Sun Liquor.

Foreign National, 300 E Pike St

Sun Liquor, 607 Summit Ave E

“Nothing beats the Fremont Brewery,” Julia argues. “We have kids so it’s hard for us to go out a lot and this place is so wonderfully family friendly! Not to mention the view! Swoon. If you’re looking for a good mixed drink, Oddfellows in Cap-Hill makes my favorite bourbon cocktail.”

Fremont Brewery, 1050 N 34th St

WHERE TO PEOPLE WATCH

Image c/o Molly Moons

Deborah has a whole day planned where you can sneak in some ideal people watching. “In the heart of Capitol Hill, Oddfellows cafe/bar is a great place for people watching. Afterwards, grab ice cream at Molly Moons (above) on east Pine Street  and head to Cal Anderson park, or go down the block to Elliott Bay Books for some travel reading.” Okay, that’s three times Oddfellows has been suggested. As the ideal place to grab a bite, drinks and people watch, it’s officially at the top of our list.

Molly Moons, multiple locations

Cal Anderson Park, 1635 11th Ave

Elliott Bay Books1521 10th Ave

“I’d have to say the Ballard farmers market (below)!” says Julia. “We love strolling through all the farmers markets in Seattle and we’re so lucky to have them in different neighborhoods year round. We spend all day Sunday between Fremont and Ballard checking out local makers, vintage sellers and farmers. It’s a dream.”

Ballard Farmers Market, 5300 Ballard Ave NW

Image c/o Ballards Farmers Market

Suk heads to The Olympic Sculpture Park (below). “You get the locals and you get the tourists. You get the earth and art-conscious, and you get selfie addicts. All are worth watching,” she confesses. That sounds like the ultimate people watching day.

Olympic Sculpture Park, 2901 Western Ave

Images by Benjamin Benschneider

Bonus: We’ve teamed up with these guys for an exclusive flash sale! Shop ‘em all at up to 85% off, but only until August 30. This way >

Lead image by Benjamin Benschneider

The Best of Chicago’s Pilsen Neighborhood With The Shudio

When checking out a new neighborhood, we prefer to consult the experts. So when the rad women behind The Shudio offered to show us around Pilsen in Chicago, our answer was obvious. Founded by Merl Kinzie, The Shudio is part sustainable store, part metalsmith studio, with a carefully curated selection of eco-conscious goods, handcrafted jewelry, alongside vintage clothing, accessories and home goods. And in case you can’t make it out they house that day, they also have an unreal online shop managed by Rachael Glasder. Their deep love for vintage started where most does – at a young age and on a budget. From there thrifting became all about the hunt for unique decor and standout clothing. Merl and Rachel’s appreciation for vintage, and vintage-inspired style, is unmistakable.

The Shudio is just one of the unique and charming storefronts in Pilsen, so we quizzed them on their favorite hangouts. Trust us, this list will make you want to hop on the next flight to Chicago.

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Rawson Vintage Raw Hem Trench; Vintage shirt from The Shudio; Model’s own Rawson Vintage flares (similar here); Model’s own Everlane boots (similar here); Cylde’s Rebirth necklace (similar here). 

img_5258

Rawson Vintage Penguin Coat; Vintage shift dress; Vintage black lace up boots; Cylde’s Rebirth necklace

1. There are several wonderful coffee spots, but we like Jumping Bean. Straightforward coffee and yummy bagel varieties.

2. While walking west on 18th Street, we like to pop into Pilsen Community Books to pick up the latest work by Sandra Cisneros. They have a beautiful selection of new works as well as a refined collection of vintage books, some of which we carry at The Shudio.

img_5106

Vintage denim studio coat; Vintage top; Model’s own Rawson vintage sailor pants (similar here); CHC collection limited release bag; Model’s own L.L. Bean Signature clogs (similar here); Cylde’s Rebirth bracelet.

3. Not much further down on the same side of the street is Verdant Matter, a ceramics and plant store, with the prettiest vessels for indoor plants as well as natural self care products and thoughtful gift ideas.

4. Pilsen is known for its involvement in the arts and specifically it’s collection of murals on 16th Street. The large colorful mural shown is by artist Victor Reyes.

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5. When it’s nice out, after closing up the shop, we like to stop by our friends’ garden to throw a little fresh cilantro in our corononitas.

6. The options for tacos are never-ending in this neighborhood, but we have collectively whittled down our favorites to: Atotonilco for fish tacos and Don Pedro’s for homemade tortillas. 

7. To experience a more-than-a-dive-bar-but-still-a-dive-bar, one must go to Skylark. With affordable drinks and flattering low lighting, this place is our favorite.

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Vintage camel coat; Vintage Donna Mizar silk blouse; Model’s own vintage Levi 517’s (similar here); Model’s own Everlane boots (similar here); Model’s own Rayban sunglasses (similar here).

Models: Laura and Marg
Photographer: Merl Kinzie
Stylist: Rachael Glasder