The Insider’s Guide to Tel Aviv

Located on the edge of the Mediterranean, Tel Aviv is a haven of buttery beaches and vibrant culture. The Israeli city — nicknamed “the White City” for the surplus of white, 1930s Bauhaus-style buildings that decorate the streets — boasts a unique combination of old and new: thousands of years of history set within a young, modern, cosmopolitan atmosphere. A place you sip black coffee on a storied palm tree-lined boulevard, explore an ancient port and discover a pop-up boutique tucked around the corner of the crumbly walls, stumble across a feminist art exhibition held in a restored Ottoman-era building. Elderly men play backgammon and smoke cigarettes in open-air markets while the latest, hippest restaurant bustles feverishly in the space next door. As such, it’s really no surprise that the city is such a fertile breeding ground for all kinds of creatives, from chefs and architects to musicians, artists and designers. This juxtaposition supplies Tel Aviv — at once a beach town, a thriving arts hub, an inclusive space for both tradition and boundary-pushing ideas — with a spirited energy that fuels the need to discover and rediscover it time and time again.

With that in mind, we asked a couple of our closest local pals to give us the low down on all of their go-to places to eat, beach and sightsee in the colorful, vivacious place they call home.

 

WHERE TO EAT

Photos by Roni Cnaani

“Oasis on Montefiori St,” says Gittit Szwarc, designer behind the multidisciplinary studio Knobbly. “It’s the vision of a mad and inspired chef, Rima Olvera. I’m a food culture skeptic in general — I eat to get through my day, usually while reading/talking/texting. I remember being a little upset the first time I ate at Oasis because I couldn’t ignore the food I was eating the way I’m used to doing. I had to stop and experience it. And the place is designed to support it, dark and minimal with weird murals in the patio from local artist Klone. It’s a place to go to experience food as art.”

The charming Montefiori St is home to another excellent restaurant, this one at a boutique hotel. “Hotel Montefiori is a great option if you’re more into French-inspired classics, and is the place for an over the top breakfast/brunch,” adds Hila Chemony of Vender.

For the best hummus — a classic staple of the Israeli diet — in town, both Gittit and Hila recommend Abu Hassan in Jaffa. “Get the “Hummus Masabakha” (hummus with chickpeas cooked for 8 hours) with a brown egg,” Gittit says. “It’s only open until 4PM, the good stuff usually runs out by 2, it’s super crowded and noisy with communal seating, and you’ll be in and out in 15 minutes — the original hummus experience.” Check out Garger Hazahav (which means “the Golden Chickpea” in Hebrew) in the funky Florentin neighbourhood, too. “They have amazing hummus, delicious sides and a cool casual vibe,” describes Hila.

Oasis, Montefiore St 17

Hotel Montefiori, Montefiori St 36

Abu Hassan, Ha-Dolfin St 1

Garger Hazahav, Levinsky 30

Bait Thailandi, Bograshov St 8

 

WHERE TO DRINK

Unequivocally, the Teder. “It’s located in a courtyard surrounded by a complex with mainly artist and designer studios and there’s always some unoccupied room or corridor being taken over by an exhibition, pop up shop or music label, as well as live shows in the main area,” Gittit says. “You can find a quiet spot to sit with friends or take your drink and walk around to see what’s happening.”

The four-level complex itself is called Beit Romano and, along with the Teder, Hila suggests exploring the whole place. “The Romano restaurant on the second level is a great spot for dinner and drinks.”

The Teder, Beit Romano, Derech Jaffa 9

Romano, Beit Romano, Derech Jaffa 9

 

WHERE TO PEOPLE WATCH

Photos by Roni Cnaani

One of the most wonderful things about Tel Aviv is its diversity. And the Great Synagogue, built in the 1920s and located on Allenby St, is a great spot to go at night to people watch, Hila says. Have a drink at Port Sa’id just across the street and settle in for the evening.

“Casino San Remo in the Noga District in Jaffa — a cafe by day and bar by night,” Gittit adds. “It’s casual but not too small, so there’s a wide range of people of all ages and walks of life who feel at home there in different hours of the day.”

Great Synagogue, Allenby St 110

Port Sa’id, Har Sinai St 5

Casino San Remo, Nehama St 2

 

WHERE TO BEACH

The White City’s coastline, with gorgeous yellow sand beaches looking out at jewel blue water, is hard to beat. “Beit Haetzel beach right on the edge of Tel Aviv and the beginning of Jaffa is simply beautiful,” Hila says. “If you’re into surfing (or surfers) you should head to Hilton beach, and don’t miss the Independence Garden right above it.”

Gittit recommends the laid back Ajami beach, just south of Old Jaffa.

Photos by Yasmine Shemesh (left) and Roni Cnaani (right)

 

WHERE TO SHOP

The best shopping district? “The Noga District!” Gittit says. “It’s where my studio is located. Most of the designers’ spaces there function foremost as studios and second as shops, which means you’ll usually be talking to the designer herself when you enter. You can find some conceptual-yet-wearable stuff at Magpie Goose (with whom I share studio space), HOKO, Juliett and Naomi Maaravi, strong clean basics at KAV, and you’ll be breathing sea air the whole time.”

For an eclectic experience, Hila suggests wandering the flea market in Jaffa — the Shuk HaPishpushim. “It is a fun way to spend half a day between the independent designer shops, galleries, cafes and a great place to find flea market finds.”

Noga District, in between Tel Aviv and Jaffa

Flea Market, Jaffa

 

WHERE TO SIGHTSEE

Photos by Yasmine Shemesh

“Try and find a nice bike (or rent one of the city’s) and spend a day going from the Jaffa flea market and up Rothschild Blvd,” Gittit says. “I feel like cycling is the best way to feel the city.” Another superb way to take in Tel Aviv’s culture is going to watch local bands perform. “There’s some really amazing stuff happening here this year,” Gittit adds. “Girl punk duo Deaf Chonky, glam rock band the White Screen, political punk from Antigona Rex, lots of interesting electronic and stoner rock stuff!”

“Tel Aviv’s historical neighborhoods are absolutely gorgeous,” Hila says. “Neve Tzedek or Old Jaffa are a must, and the Tel Aviv Museum of Art (and the new wing especially) has great exhibitions throughout the year.”

Rothschild Boulevard

Neve Tzedek, southwestern Tel Aviv

Old Jaffa, Jaffa

 

ONE MORE THING YOU ABSOLUTELY MUST DO

For Gittit, when anyone visits Israel, they must take a trip out to the Dead Sea. It’s a two-hour drive, but so worth it. “It’s such a surreal and intense place unlike anything else on Earth,” she says. Staying strictly in Tel Aviv, though? Find an Airbnb in North Jaffa and make it your home base. “Tel Aviv can be really intense and Jaffa is the more laid back and arty part of the city, so that’s where I tend to spend more time.”

And, before you go, a coast-to-coast walk along the beachfront is essential. “Starting up north at Reding, going all the way through Tel Aviv Port, the boardwalk and into Jaffa’s Old Port and Old City,” says Hila. “Tel Aviv’s beach is always an option, no matter the season, time or mood.”

by Yasmine Shemesh

Meet the Artists We Invited to Draw All Over Our Merch

We spent the weekend at Capsule, the roving independent designer-focused trade show, in New York, joined by some pretty choice company. Along with our curated community of indie designers presenting their spring/summer 2018 collections, we had the pleasure of working with six talented illustrators on some pretty special giveaways. Throughout the weekend, the artists spent hours drawing on exclusive Garmentory tote bags for anybody that stopped by our booth and wanted one, with no limit to their creativity. From self-portraits to animals of all kind, each drawing was one of a kind. We wanted people to leave Capsule with something unique, something memorable, and that’s exactly what these ladies delivered. Their stories, inspirations, mediums and aesthetics are all remarkably different, adding to the uniqueness of their canvas bag creations. Scroll on to get to know the six illustrators and rad women we now happily call our pals.

 

Gina Schiappacasse

Designer, stylist, and fashion illustrator Gina Schiappacasse, has been obsessively drawing all her life. Originally from Minnesota, she holds a Bachelor of Science in Fashion Design from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, as well as an Associate’s Degree in Fashion Design with an emphasis in illustration from the Fashion Institute of Technology. Gina has now spent nearly a decade living in Brooklyn with her boyfriend and dog, Thelonious.

Living in New York, Gina finds herself inspired by the fashion world: photography, icons, and the city’s stylish denizens. With influence from the style of children’s books and Japanese comic art, Gina’s work is fashion-focused with a playful slant.

WHO ARE YOUR MUSES?I’m a huge fan of Björk and her constant ability to blur the lines between fashion and art. I also have always loved Alexander McQueen’s dark beauty and the women he dressed, including Daphne McGuiness and Isabella Blow. I’m in love with the photography work of Tim Walker and Sølve Sundsbø, but I also really enjoy drawing my friends and Instagram acquaintances. There’s such an incredible plethora of imagery online that it’s easy to find muses everywhere.”

 

Youloune

French illustrator Youloune is the kind of artist who carries their sketchbook everywhere they go. She grew up in Normandie, France, lived in Paris for ten years and in January of this year moved to Montreal with her boyfriend to experience somewhere new. Hélène loves to draw what she sees out and about, whether that’s at a concert, sketching the musicians playing as her pencil follows the drum rhythms, or details in jewelry, sculptures, and embroidery shown in museums she often visits. Her illustrations are mesmerizing as she draws as if she is pulling thread from a spool to make silhouettes and stories appear on paper.

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE THING TO DO ON A NIGHT IN? “I like reading comics, listening to old vinyl records, and trying to catch my neighbor’s cat! I also take the time to upload all the pictures I took during my daily walks onto my Insta stories.”

 

Gabriella Cetrulo

 

Gabriella Cetrulo grew up in a the suburbs of New Jersey before moving  to New York City to earn her BFA in Illustration from Parsons. After spending many years working for a tech company as a web curator — her drawing falling wayside — Gabriella is now a freelance writer and illustrator living in Manhattan.

She draws inspiration from old films and photographs, idealizing people from the past and bringing their stranger moments to current time. Once described as “ominous posing as innocuous,” by a close friend, Gabriella’s illustrations embody a strong sense of nostalgia. Through character details such as a hair style or vintage silhouette, she brings decades of the past to the paper in front of her.

ARE YOU A MORNING PERSON? WHAT’S YOUR ROUTINE LIKE?I’m definitely not a morning person. I could easily sleep until noon if I don’t need to be anywhere. I usually hit the snooze button at least three times, read some things on my phone, check social media, and then get out of bed to make myself tea. I try to meditate in the morning but usually end up doing that before bed because if I’m still tired in the morning, I’ll just fall back asleep!”

 

Lindsey Balbierz

Lindsey Balbierz is an illustrator whose work lives in many mediums: magazines, book covers, newspapers, as well as live events. She’s the talent behind the cover of I See London, I See France, a book published by Harper Collins, The Boston Globe’s illustrated Sunday real estate section,  a custom pet portrait on a Louis Vuitton dopp kit for a long-time loyal customer, and so much more. She also runs an Etsy shop, where she sells pins, patches and stationery adorned with her illustrations. There are no limitations to where Lindsey pulls inspiration from. Seriously, anything from maps to dogs in bags and farmers markets to snow cones, influence her work. All of Lindsey’s illustrated objects, people and environments are friendly and whimsical. Her distinct aesthetic of hand-drawn, brightly, graphic colors is to say the least warm and welcoming.

IF YOU HAD TO PICK UP AND MOVE, WHERE WOULD YOU CHOOSE AND WHY?My top three would be: 1.) Somewhere outside of Portland, Maine. I’ve always had a dream of buying a farm house and renovating it. The coastal surroundings are so pretty. The lobster is also a bonus. 2.) Maui. I went in 2015 and enjoyed the lush greenery so much! It would allow a slower and more relaxed lifestyle that would be a good change from urban living. 3.) Japan. I have visited Japan twice, but I think moving would allow for a complete immersion of the culture. I’ve taken Japanese classes, but I think moving would force my brain to think in Japanese and therefore force me to speak the language more.”

 

Danielle Kroll

Danielle Kroll is a textile designer, ceramicist, and — of course — illustrator. She is also the co-founder of Beech Hall, a multi-disciplinary artist collective she started with two university friends selling handmade and one-of-a-kind items such as paintings, ceramics, jewelry and home decor. Inspired by everyday life, childhood memories, objects from the past and nature. Danielle’s illustrations are colorful, painterly and playful but not childlike. Think a skinny pineapple ceramic or quirky depictions of ladies at the beach. Her pieces encourage her viewers to experience a more playful look at life – to always look at the bright side of things.

WHERE DO YOU LOVE TO SHOP IN A CITY FILLED WITH ENDLESS CHOICES? “I mostly shop at vintage stores. The pieces are unique, affordable and it’s really fun for me – I like a good treasure hunt! Dusty Rose Vintage in Greenpoint is my spot in the city: They have a whole room of boxes labeled with specific categories like ‘jumpsuits’ and ’80s high-waisted pants’. “

 

Lily Qian

DC-born, Brooklyn-based fashion designer-turned-illustrator Lily Qian has been drawing, painting and sewing since childhood. With her inspiration sparked by artists and entrepreneurs, Lily reflects the beauty of everyday life in her work, which is stylistically informed by cinematography, literature, and fashion history (particularly the 1960s and ‘70s). In her 12 years as an illustrator, Lily has worked with fashion and beauty brands ranging from Sephora to OBEY, sought after for her experimental techniques and loose, romantic style.

DO YOU HAVE A FAVORITE PLACE TO ESCAPE FROM NEW YORK’S CRAZINESS?My favorite places to escape NYC’s craziness is going hiking in Harriman State Park, visiting Storm King Art Center, Dia Beacon, and long weekends in Montauk.”

 

Beyond The Canvas: Two Multimedia Artists To Watch

With so much talent out there, it is truly exciting when you discover an artist whose work makes your jaw drop and your mind race. Well, that was our exact reaction when we came across the two artists featured below: Katie Bell and Andrea Bergart. With each a distinct aesthetic of their own, these artists are creating captivating art that goes way beyond your typical understanding of art. Their manipulation of everyday materials and objects is straight up beautiful. One of these talented women can takes garbage scraps and turns them into a 9 ft tall sculptural painting and the other transforms working cement trucks into moving public murals. So, without further ado, let your artist crushes begin.

KATIE BELL

Photo by Levi Mandel

The moment we caught sight of Katie Bell’s large-scale paintings we couldn’t look away. Her art goes above and beyond, outwards and upwards, literally. Katie creates her pieces with found materials that she herself went digging for. From ceiling tiles to hot tub fragments, she turns so-called garbage into unreal art. Her color composition, structural thought and innate attention to placement detail will blow your mind. Not to mention, this bad-ass woman can haul bounds of material and somehow get them all on a wall.

TELL US A LITTLE ABOUT YOURSELF. My name is Katie Bell and I am originally from Rockford, Illinois. I have been living and working in Brooklyn, NY for the past six years. I make large sculptural paintings out of found material.

HAS ART BEEN A PART OF YOUR LIFE SINCE YOU WERE LITTLE? I have a twin brother who is also an artist, and I think growing up we fostered that creative interest in each other.  We were always making drawings, games, costumes, piñatas, plays, forts, obstacle courses, etc.  We were collaborators on all kinds of things and our parents were always encouraging us to make things. I began making paintings in college and started making still-lives to paint from.  The still-lives eventually grew larger and larger and turned into the work I am making now. I have always come to art from an interest in painting.

ALL YOUR SCULPTURAL PAINTINGS ARE MADE FROM FOUND MATERIALS. WHAT’S YOUR PROCESS OF SOURCING LIKE? I am constantly looking for materials and try to find one thing everyday to bring back to the studio. I am mostly finding things on the street, in dumpsters, and at construction sites. My studio acts as a catch-all for all my finds. Things will be rolling around the studio a while before I figure out what to do with them.

HAS YOUR HUNT FOR MATERIAL BECOME EASIER AS YOU’VE GROWN AS AN ARTIST? DO YOU HAVE A FAVORITE / GO-TO SOURCE? The hunt is different every time, but it is always a very physical task. As my work has grown I have gotten more specific, so I am looking for particular things now. My favorite part of gathering materials is the looking. I have so many places that I go to regularly to find materials, but one of the best spots is Bartos Pools and Spas. I have made friends with the owner and she saves old hot tubs for me to cut apart.

WHAT’S THE WEIRDEST THING YOU’VE EVER FOUND? THE BEST THING? Weirdest: A three-foot tall rawhide bone. Best: A faux blue geode bookend.

Top image: ‘Backsplash’, cork, foam, drywall, laminate, wood, plexiglass, rocks, plastic, Kleenex box, rubber, springs, steel, and hot tub fragments, 144 x 276 x 108, 2016 Photo cred: Zack Balber with Ginger Photography Inc.

Middle image: ‘Broadcast’, acrylic, wood, ceiling tiles, foam, drywall, plexiglass, nails, laminate, rocks, and plastic on wall, 264 x 156 x 22, 2016. Photo cred: Zack Balber with Ginger Photography Inc.

Bottom image: Breakout’, acrylic, wood, laminate, foam, ceiling tiles, rope, drywall, marble, and nails on wall, 144 x 108 x 108, 2016

Visit katiebellstudio.com for more and follow @katies_bell

ANDREA BERGART

Photo by Maddy Talias

Our love for Andrea Bergart’s work may be new but it’s already very serious. It was just the beginning of May when we started seeing these seriously cool basketball handbags all over our Instagram feed and on all our favorite online magazines. If you didn’t already guess, Andrea is the one behind these bags. We then discovered this was in fact her first design project and that she is also an incredible artist with a long list of talents.

TELL US A LITTLE ABOUT YOURSELF. I grew up in the suburbs of Boston and the woods of Maine, I live in Ridgewood, Queens and I am an artist.

YOU DO A LOT OF LARGE-SCALE PUBLIC MURALS. HOW DID YOU GET INTO THAT AND WHAT DO YOU LOVE MOST ABOUT PRESENTING YOUR ART THIS WAY? I have a steady studio practice but occasionally my work will take me to the streets where I can make something extra large. My last series of public works involved painting murals on working cement truck barrels. This idea came to me after spending a year living in West Africa where people paint on everything- signs, walls, houses and buses.  Painting on cement trucks seemed like an exciting extension of this way of thinking about images in public spaces. I love how the cement trucks travel throughout NYC and reach so many different audiences. It’s cool that they are also delivering cement and going into construction sites. I like mixing high and low- fine art and working trucks. I also enjoy seeing the paint decay and get grimey – art dealing with the daily grind.

YOU RECENTLY LAUNCHED A LINE OF BASKETBALL HANDBAGS. HOW DID IT FEEL TO STEP ASIDE FROM PAINTING AND INTO DESIGN? I’m into hybrids right now- things with multiple functions- sort of like the cement truck with art on it. Designing an object that has a function is a lot different than making art. You can be very creative but you are always considering the practicality of the design. It’s fun to play with people’s expectations of objects and form.

SO, WE’VE HEARD YOU’RE KIND OF AMAZING AT PLAYING THE GAME. CAN YOU TELL US ABOUT THE DOWNTOWN GIRLS BASKETBALL TEAM YOU’RE A PART OF?  Ha! I’m okay. : ) Downtown girls basketball is conceived by artist Aria McManus. Aria has created and attracted such a cool community. Sure we ball but we also talk about what’s going on in our lives, go to each other’s art openings, collaborate, and bring and reflect positive vibes.

HAS THIS TEAM BECOME A CREATIVE HUB FOR YOUR LADIES? We meet up once a week and having that consistent hang out schedule makes the team an important part of my life.  The routine helps it feel like a family. I think we have a sense of loyalty to each other and that helps me be bolder in my life than I would otherwise be.

Images from top left to bottom right: ‘Trident’, dye and wax on silk mounted on paper, 108″ x 56″; ‘Cheetos’, cement truck mural; Basketball Purse (Skills) Photo Cred: Maddy Talias; Basketball Purse (OG) Photo Cred: Maddy Talias; ‘Swamp Sunset’, acrylic on canvas, 72″ x 60″;  Embossed leather strap detail Photo Cred: Maddy Talias.

Visit andreabergart.com for more and follow @andreabergart.

GRL PWR: Women We Love

On Saturday, January 21st in Washington, DC, and across North America, an incredible event of solidarity is set to take place. In honor and admiration of the Women’s March, we’ve rounded up some seriously amazing women and organizations that we want you to know about (if you don’t already). From activists to designers to artists, women all over the world are affecting change, big and small. Every single effort and voice counts and we are lucky to be working with so many rad ladies in our community. We’re proud of the word community too, and of the mutual admiration and support for one another we witness and take part in every single day. Below are three designers, four organizations and two influential women we should all be following this year. Get to know them now.

Take a peek at our selection of products that support the causes we love >

 

THE LABELS

 

UNIFORME Magazine-Image---Vertical-PP

Brooklyn brand UNIFORME makes simple, beautiful garments that are seasonless and easy to wear. They do amazing things on the regular such as this limited edition Anderson Tee embroidered with a tonal PP monogram. Now, of course this is not your ordinary t-shirt. When you buy this tee the net proceeds will be donated to Planned Parenthood. Plus, UNIFORME has designed the piece as a structured, feminine interpretation of your closet staple so you can feel good while doing good.

Buy the tee here.

KNOBBLY X LAURIE FRANCK

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Gittit Szwarc is the designer behind Knobbly, a multidisciplinary studio focusing on jewelry and artists collaborations. Her recent collaboration is with photographer and handpoke tattoo artist Laurie Franck. In all of Laurie’s work, across mediums, the naked body is at the center of her art: alone, in love, sexual, or abstract. Her use of fragile lines deconstructs the human shape; reminding us that it’s this body that connects us to ourselves, and above all, connects us to each other. This rad collaboration tee depicts the female body in an abstract form and is made in Tel Aviv and printed in the Knobbly studio by their team.

Buy the tee here.

BETH RICHARDS

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Designer Beth Richards is known for her functional yet luxurious swimwear. Doing something a little different (and amazing), she has designed this simple white tee with a black censor bar across the chest. Beth states, “The censor graphic was created for my debut collection in 2012 for the Girl with a Rebel Heart. Hard to believe today it still resonates almost moreso iconic”. In conjunction with the Gloria Steinem Foundation this tee aims to bring together women in solidarity. All proceeds of the sale will go towards the betterment of women’s lives and progressing women’s rights around the world on the quest for equality.

Buy the tee here.

THE ORGANIZATIONS

 

THE WING

The Wing
Photo by The Wing

New York’s The Wing is a home base for women: a work and social space designed for convenience and connection. Generated by the fact that taking up space can be a profound act in a society where men have the power and prestige, The Wing’s rules are all written by women. It’s a place for women to work, communicate and relax in a non-threatening atmosphere. An offline destination for women to build essential relationships, hatch plans and really… run the world together.

Learn more about The Wing here.

 PLANNED PARENTHOOD

planned parenthood
Photo by Planned Parenthood

October 2016 marked Planned Parenthood’s 100 year strong. Today, it is a trusted health care provider, an informed educator, a passionate advocate, and a global partner helping similar organizations around the world. They deliver vital reproductive health care, sex education, and information to millions of women, men and youth worldwide. With the heart of Planned Parenthood in the local community, they currently have 57 unique, locally governed affiliates nationwide that operate approximately 650 health centers. Let’s keep this number growing.

Get involved here.

GIRLS OF NEW YORK

Girls Of New York
Photo by @gonymovement

Girls of New York was created by Nicole Zivkovic and Miki Nakano (above) in August 2014. They started their movement as a social media initiative to raise awareness of girl’s issues, combat stereotypes and micro-aggressions, and ultimately inspire and empower other girls to share their stories. They interview, photograph, and post pictures of women and their allies in an effort to portray the diverse array of people they meet in New York. Through this they spark conversations about the pertinent issues that affect the lives of each and every person they met, and spread awareness of what goes on in our world especially what impacts girls and women. We couldn’t think of a better way to use the power of social media.

Get to know Girls of New York and follow the GONY Movement here.

MS. FOUNDATION

About-Us-Landing
Photo by Ms. Foundation

Ms. Foundation works to bring attention to the real challenges facing women, especially women of color and low-income women who are living in poverty, working paycheck to paycheck or both. They work day in and day out to advocate for national and statewide policy change that will address these challenges while supporting over 100 organizations throughout the United States that are working for change on a grassroots level. They fight with fuel coming from that fact that for every woman who has reached the “top” there are millions of women struggling to earn a living wage, gain access to basic health care, secure affordable child care and participate in the opportunities that should be available to every person.

Support the collective here.

 

WOMEN TO FOLLOW

 

GRETCHEN JONES

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Gretchen Jones currently lives Portland and is a Executive MBA (Fashion) candidate at the University of the Arts London – London College of Fashion, seeking to extend her creative influence beyond collection design. She is a visual artist whose passion has always been rooted in being an advocate for sustainable business practices, especially within the fashion industry. She uses her voice and her Instagram as a platform to speak out about women’s issues, express her experiences and feelings and really start a conversation.

I believe we can utilize social media for its potential to bring us together, not tear us apart. This is a critical time in our history, for ourselves and our families and our friends AND the next generation. Being responsible, activated/engaged and enjoying the ride of life (and our social platforms) doesn’t have to be mutually exclusive. But that’s up to each of us individually. Are we ready to challenge ourselves to think beyond each post and back into reality? I sure hope so. We certainly need to be.” 

Follow Gretchen Jones here.

JODY ROGAC

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Jody Rogac was in born in England, and raised in Vancouver, BC. She currently lives and works in New York as a photographer. Whether it’s a portrait or a fashion shoot, she loves to photograph people. Jody works closely with her subjects in order to capture them as simply as possible, in their most natural moment. Her work often includes photographing the beautiful faces of powerful women such as Jemima Kirke, Liv Tyler, Petra Collins and Erykah Badu. With uncomplicated styling, choice of subject and ever-perfect composition, Jody brings to light the intelligence and strong-willed natural beauty within every woman she photographs. Her work is thoughtful, raw and truly stunning.

“Photographing women in particular wasn’t something I set out to do, it just happened naturally. I also love to photograph men, and subjects of all kinds. I do however love to photograph women in a thoughtful manner, and show off the strength in them.”

Follow Jody Rogac here.

Shop our selection of products that support the causes we love >